Got raped? It’s your own fault, you filthy whore.

Listen up, sweetheart: You buy the ticket, you take the ride.

You made your choice when you picked the guy, who is going to run his standard modus operandi on you, just like he ran it on the last three-dozen hoes he played.

If you tumble into a random hook-up with no prior knowledge of the guy’s reputation and he turns out to be a selfish brute whose standard modus operandi is repulsive, dangerous or painful, in what sense are you a victim of anything except your own stupidity?

This at least seems to be the opinion of Robert Stacy McCain, a popular right wing blogger.

Much more color here including a slight backing down from these remarks by McCain and a response from Feministing’s Jill Filipovic. Please read the entire thing: http://www.mediaite.com/online/keith-olbermann-refuses-to-correct-his-treatme…

I’d like to hear some explanations now on why anyone should ever read another word this disgusting misogynist ever pens. I know I won’t.

18 Comments

  1. Anonymous December 21, 2010

    The guy’s a misogynist for having an opinion? Hysterical much?
    Seems like “misogynist” is the new “racist”. Women throw it at anyone they disagree with. I admit I haven’t read much written by McCain (only recently discovering his blog), but the entry you reference contains nothing that would make me believe McCain hates women. How absurd.

  2. Wayne Myers December 23, 2010

    He’s written a little manual on how to have a successful right-wing blog:

    http://rsmccain.blogspot.com/2009/02/how-to-get-million-hits-on-your-blog-in.html

    Worth a read, especially the bit where he explains why there is no need to bother crafting logical arguments.

  3. Anonymous December 24, 2010

    Your comment seems a bit out of line to the other side of the spectrum. RSM is no misogynist.

    Is there no common ground? Or are you as whacky as Borgstrom…

    Even in gender-conscious Sweden, Borgstrom has raised eyebrows for speaking out so strongly against the male norms he says still pervade Swedish society.

    He has said all men bear a collective responsibility for the fact that some men abuse women. In 2006, he even proposed that Sweden withdraw from soccer’s World Cup because of an expected surge in the sex trade in host nation Germany, where prostitution is legal.

    “What happens during the World Cup is that women are imported – in the full sense of the word – to meet the demands from the men going there to buy sex,” Borgstrom told Swedish TV at the time.

    His proposal was rejected by the Swedish soccer federation and Sweden took part in the tournament as planned.

    Borgstrom has previously described his passion for women’s rights and equality as bordering on an obsession.

    “Now that I really have put on my ‘gender goggles’ I see everything through them,” he was quoted as saying in 2004 by the tabloid Aftonbladet.

    Nice goggles. Amanda Marcotte would approve.

  4. Anna Tarkov December 24, 2010

    Sure, there can be common ground. But I hesitate to say anything else when you’re so clearly intent on pigeonholing me into some preconceived notion of a rabid, evil feminist or whatever you imagine Amanda Marcotte or other women to be. In my experience, it’s very difficult to discuss an issue with someone who has their mind already made up.

    As for RSM, I respectfully disagree. He is a misogynist through and through. Misogyny, as you’re probably familiar, is a a cultural hatred of women simply because they are female. It can be manifested in many different ways from off-color jokes to pornography to believing women should feel ashamed of their bodies. A misogynist might still have functional friendships with women or be married or have daughters. It doesn’t change the fact that he hates women.

  5. Anonymous December 26, 2010

    @Anna “Misogyny, as you’re probably familiar, is a a cultural hatred of women simply because they are female. It can be manifested in many different ways from off-color jokes to pornography to believing women should feel ashamed of their bodies. A misogynist might still have functional friendships with women or be married or have daughters. It doesn’t change the fact that he hates women.”

    It would appear to me that by definition you’ve described a set that might easily be said to encompass 95% of all men in the US and by defining that set as misogynist you’ve pretty much self-identified yourself as a very hard core misandrist. As for myself, while I am not particularly fond of quite a lot of American women having spent much of my working life outside of the US, I don’t define the negative characteristics of women in as nearly an all-encompassing all encompassing manner as you do for men.

    What’s with that, do you suppose? :-/

  6. Anna Tarkov December 26, 2010

    I didn’t say that engaging in any of those things absolutely means one is a misogynist. Most men have probably looked at pornography. Of course it doesn’t mean they are misogynists. Most men have probably made a joke or two at the expense of women. It doesn’t mean they are misogynists. Rather the persistent and frequent occurrence of these and other factors points to a misogynistic man. As with most things, actions speak louder than words.

    I also don’t ascribe the actions and views of some men to all men. I’m not sure what I said that could have given that impression. I know quite well that many men (increasingly more men these days I think) are sensitive, caring and respectful towards women. What’s more, men are beginning to understand why things like the sexualization of women in mass media and the rape culture are important issues to address. Men are beginning to grasp that respecting women isn’t just a courtly obligation, but a societal imperative.

    I’m now fascinated by your assertion that you don’t like most American women since you’ve spent a lot of time outside the U.S. Why is that?

  7. Anonymous December 26, 2010

    @Anna “I’m now fascinated by your assertion that you don’t like most American women since you’ve spent a lot of time outside the U.S. Why is that?”

    If I had to sum it up without writing pages of what would look like utter bosh after the fact, I suspect that what put me off most was the near universal use by American women I encountered on my return to the states of the very toxic phrase “excuse me?”, most often repetitively, as a means of verbally censoring anything said by a man that a particular woman didn’t want to hear or have said aloud in public.

    After having been gone for decades, I found that the tenor of American women’s conversation had taken on a shrill, manipulative and unmistakably nasty tone that I couldn’t remember from before. Mind, I’d seen that sort of behaviour in a very, very mild form in Sweden, where I’d lived and worked for several years at the beginning of the 1980’s, but nowhere with the virulence that I’d encountered it within a few days of having come to the US in the late 1990s.

    Indeed, I found that trying to socialise with American women virtually universally was much like trying to walk on eggs without breaking them. After a while, I came to realise that for most of the women I encountered there was no way to engage them for any extended period of time without tripping over one or another of their many shibboleths and being verbally and extensively attacked for being the epitome of everything they “hated” about men in general.

    After more nearly ten years of thinking that surely everybody I encountered couldn’t haven’t fallen prey to this kind of uncivilised behaviour, I finally threw my hands up and stopped trying to engage them. It was too fraught and far too unpleasant.

  8. Anna Tarkov December 26, 2010

    All I can say is that I haven’t found the same to be true about any American women I know. And I don’t think it’s only because I’m a woman. Lots of people can be difficult to talk to and sure, it might be easier to withdraw and not even try. But to me that kind of giving up is unfathomable, especially when it comes to such a gigantic group as “American women.”

  9. Anonymous December 26, 2010

    @Anna “Lots of people can be difficult to talk to and sure, it might be easier to withdraw and not even try. But to me that kind of giving up is unfathomable”

    I gather you missed the part about “ten years.” :-/

  10. Anna Tarkov December 26, 2010

    I didn’t miss it. I chose to ignore it. I don’t believe that in 10 years you met not a single American woman you could tolerate. If I DID believe it, that really would smack of misogyny a bit.

  11. Anonymous December 26, 2010

    @Anna “I didn’t miss it. I chose to ignore it. I don’t believe that in 10 years you met not a single American woman you could tolerate. If I DID believe it, that really would smack of misogyny ”

    Yeah, that’s a fairly typical reaction to unpleasant information. Denial and prejudice and stereotyping are wonderful coping mechanisms for ideologues faced with a reality that doesn’t meet their expectations.

  12. Anna Tarkov December 26, 2010

    I disagree. If I had heard similar complaints from at least one other man, I would be inclined to take your assertion seriously. Lacking that, it’s difficult to say whether the problem is with every American woman you managed to speak to in a 10 year span or if the issue is with you. Anyone of even a vaguely scientific mindset would agree. It is much more likely that the problem is with you than with hundreds or thousands (??) of women, wouldn’t you say?

  13. Anonymous December 26, 2010

    @Anna “Anyone of even a vaguely scientific mindset would agree.”

    Really? I am a scientist. Are you a scientist to claim such a mindset? Do you know how many women it would take to make a proper statistical sample? For a sample using small sample statistics?

  14. Anna Tarkov December 26, 2010

    This is rapidly getting silly. I think we can leave it at this: I don’t believe that the majority of American women are insufferable. Apparently you do. We must agree to disagree.

  15. Anonymous December 26, 2010

    We must agree to disagree.

  16. Anonymous December 26, 2010

    When Stupid meets Evil, and Stupid gets up close and personal with Evil, and Evil decides to prove that Stupid is still very much Stupid, Evil deserves to be called out for being Evil.

    But Stupid deserves equally so to be called out for being Stupid.

  17. Anonymous December 27, 2010

    I actually found the above poster to be somewhat, correct. As long as I tried to not offend American women, they would take offense at every little thing I said and I would find myself in a proverbial corner, unable to do anything without causing offense.
    Once I ceased to care if I caused offense, I found that people no longer acted if I was causing offense. It turned out that the “offense” was just a form of manipulation to keep an easily cowed guy from expressing dissent.

    Now, however, where I disagree with the poster is that I didn’t find such behavior universal, but rather closer to a third. Also, I found this wasn’t just women. Men had begun acting in this way too, but almost only when women were around. When there were no women around, the men didn’t act like this at all. It was strange.

    I don’t think it had to do with women, so much as a cultural change in the attitude towards offense. Before, if someone took offense, it was seen as their own problem for feeling offended, but now it seems culture has shifted so that causing offense (regardless what the offense was) is perceived as the fault of the offender. This makes it easy to take offense as a form of manipulation, or to score kudo points with others in a clique.

  18. Anna Tarkov December 27, 2010

    I’m unfamiliar with what cultural change you could possibly mean. I agree that people may be overly sensitive these days, but I’m not aware of there ever having been a time when an offender was absolved of any responsibility for what they said. If I were to tell you that you’re stupid, would it be entirely your fault for feeling bad? After all, you wouldn’t feel bad at all if I hadn’t said it. Now, sure, we can argue that your self-confidence should be such that me telling you you’re stupid shouldn’t make you feel anything. But we both know that’s not realistic. You may want to live in a world where everyone’s feelings and reactions to the words of others are solely their responsibility, but I don’t.

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